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2016

Mikinaakominis / TransCanadas
Literature, Justice, Relation
SECOND CALL FOR PAPERS
An Interdisciplinary Canadian Literatures in English Conference University of Toronto
May 25-27, 2017
Co-chairs:
Smaro Kamboureli, University of Toronto
Larissa Lai, University of Calgary
Canada’s Sesquicentennial anniversary of Confederation is an occasion that invites both
celebration and the need to take critical stock of how we have arrived at our particular
juncture. We currently inhabit a historical moment in which the colonial power of
English literary studies, though still present, is giving way to an English that circulates in
newly complex ways, especially in relation to global economic shifts, intensifications in
voluntary and involuntary human migration, and the rise of new or newly imagined
spiritualities and fundamentalisms. Literary study in English on that part of
Mikinaakominis (Turtle Island) that we call Canada has shifted from a colonial project
meant to build a white settler nation to a project that was supposed to include
marginalized others, to, more recently, a project that wants to reckon with Indigeneity
and the politics of land while retaining acute attention to the cultural and social race
politics that engage Black, Asian, Muslim and white subjectivities, bodies, legalities and
cultures (as they are produced by hegemonic forces and as they emerge through social
struggle) in nonparallel, intersectional and unresolved ways. These and other related
shifts take place within a cultural field that is also changing as historical and geopolitical
circumstances change: from the time immemorial of Indigenous presence through
colonialism that includes land expropriation, disease, genocide, slavery, exclusion,
indentureship, residential schools, resource extraction, the banning of cultural practices
(e.g., potlatch), and the turning away of arrivals with the wrong skin colour, but also (for
both better and worse) democracy, the rule of law, the ideal of multiculturalism, human
rights, peace keeping and compassion towards immigrants and refugees. Social
movements seeking justice, such as Idle No More, Black Lives Matter, the Chinese
Canadian Head Tax Movement, the Komagata Maru Redress Movement, and the
Japanese Canadian Redress Movement, belong both within and beyond the bounds of the
state and dialogue with it in profound and transformational ways. In this ever-shifting
matrix that implicates both human and non-human bodies of experience, public culture
and the idea of the public have transformed through mutations in national space,
economics, climate, lands, waters, and even the air itself. Alongside the changes in public
space and conceptions of them, literature and writing in academic institutions are also
transforming in response to institutional and governmental politics. Further, within
academia the humanities are undermined in favour of knowledge mobilization designed
to serve international capital in (seemingly) pragmatic ways. This set of issues rises
beside powerful and liberatory Indigenous cultural and political resurgences that place
divergent pressures on differently racialized, gendered and otherwise embodied thinkers
and cultural producers to consider from their own specific locations, strategies, methods
and possibilities of engagement that might include solidarity, responsibility, and respect,
as well as specific contemporary and historical relationships to Indigeneity, land and
What can literature and criticism be and do under these historical, racial, and spatial
circumstances? What can decolonization mean in its cultural and socio-political valences
now? What constitutes creativity, the imagination, experimentation, community, and
embodiment at the present moment? What kinds of activist and cultural labour can
criticism and creative writing perform? What forms might such criticism and creative
writing take? This iteration of the serial TransCanada conferences invites storytellers,
poets, novelists, creative non-fiction writers, critics, interdisciplinary practitioners and
activists to enter into newly imagined and innovatively structured forms of presentation
in order to re-build a vibrant, generative, re-productive, critical and creative community,
to ask the hard questions that need to be asked now, to attempt some provisional answers,
and to make story, poem and experiment together and apart.
Keywords to be addressed:
Affect • Activism & Activism as Performance • Asianness • Avant-Garde • Balance •
Blackness • Body • Coalition • Creative & Critical Practices • Cultural Economies •
Decolonization • Diaspora • Earth/ Water/ Air/ Fire/ Metal • Embodiment/Experience •
Experimentation & Experimental Writing • Forms (Literary, Cultural) • Forms & Politics
/ Forms in Relation to Social Practices • History/Memory/Temporality • The Humanities
in Canada • Imagination • Indigeneity • Inheritance / Heritage • Institution • Justice •
Kinships • Land • Literature & Activism • Migration • Nation/ Nationalisms • New
Materialisms • Neo-liberalism • Post-Humanism • The Present • The Public •
Reconciliation • Redress • Refugeeness • Relation • Sovereignty • Transatlantic •
Transnationalism • Treaties • White Settler Nationalisms • Writing as Practice
Submission Guidelines
Please submit proposals of up to 300 words for 20-minute-long papers that address any of
the above issues. Collaborative proposals for panel sessions that break the conference
mold in interesting and generative ways, as well as proposals for stand-alone
presentations (performances, films, videos, poster presentations, and other forms of
“demonstration”) will be most welcome.
We wish to extend a special invitation to Canadian Ph.D. students for the Plenary
Session especially designed for the presentation of doctoral research projects in the field
of Canadian literary studies. Doctoral students whose dissertation projects are nearing
completion of their program and who would like to be considered for this plenary session
should submit a proposal based on their dissertation project, along with a one-page
(single-spaced) dissertation abstract. Three to five such projects will be featured in this
plenary session, while other projects will be vetted for inclusion in the concurrent panel
Deadline for all submissions: July 14, 2016
Notification of acceptance: by September 2016
Submission address: http://tinyurl.com/Mininaak-Trans
Guidelines for submission: Please submit your abstract via email as a Word document
attachment; ensure that your name and institutional affiliation don’t appear on the
abstract document; and use TC4-2017-abstract submission as the subject heading.
Proposals for panels should include the name/s of the panel convener/s, a brief rationale,
and abstracts by no more than three presenters.
Organizing Committee:
Smaro Kamboureli, Avie Bennett Chair in Canadian Literature, University of Toronto
Larissa Lai, Canada Research Chair, University of Calgary
Kit Dobson, Department of English, Mount Royal University • Petra Dolata, Canada
Research Chair, University of Calgary • James Ellis, Director, Calgary Institute of the
Humanities, University of Calgary • Emily Gilbert, Canadian Studies and Department of
Geography, University of Toronto • Kyle Kinaschuk, PhD Student, Department of
English, University of Toronto • Neil Surkan, PhD Student, Department of English,
University of Calgary • Cheryl Suzack, Department of English, University of Toronto •
Christina Turner, PhD Student, Department of English, University of Toronto • Christl
Verduyn, Director, Canadian Studies and Department of English, Mount Allison
University • Joshua Whitehead, PhD Student, Department of English, University of
Calgary • Robert Zacharias, Department of English, York University
For background information about the TransCanada conferences, please visit:

http://tinyurl.com/Mininaak-Trans


CALL FOR PAPERS
Mikinaakominis / TransCanadas
Literature, Justice, Relation
An Interdisciplinary Canadian Literatures in English Conference
University of Toronto
May 25-27, 2017

Co-chairs

Smaro Kamboureli, University of Toronto
Larissa Lai, University of Calgary

Canada’s Sesquicentennial anniversary of Confederation is an occasion that invites both celebration and the need to take critical stock of how we have arrived at our particular juncture. We currently inhabit a historical moment in which the colonial power of English literary studies, though still present, is giving way to an English that circulates in newly complex ways, especially in relation to global economic shifts, intensifications involuntary and involuntary human migration, and the rise of new or newly imagined spiritualities and fundamentalisms. Literary study in English on that part of Mikinaakominis (Turtle Island) that we call Canada has shifted from a colonial project meant to build a settler nation to a project that was supposed to include marginalized others, to, more recently, a project that must reckon with Indigeneity and the politics of land. These and other related shifts take place within a cultural field that is also changing with historical and geopolitical circumstances. Public culture and the idea of the public have transformed through mutations in national space, economics, climate, lands, waters, and even the air itself. Beside the changes in public space and our conceptions of them, literature and writing in academic institutions are also transforming in response to institutional and governmental politics. Further, within academia the humanities are undermined in favour of knowledge mobilization designed to serve international capital in (seemingly) pragmatic ways. This set of issues rises beside powerful and liberatory Indigenous cultural and political resurgences and an accompanying imperative for non-Indigenous people—imagined variously in racial and geo-political terms—to consider anew responsibilities, respect, and strategies of cultural engagement as well as specific contemporary and historical relationships to Indigeneity, land and movement.

What can literature and criticism be and do under these historical and spatial circumstances? What can decolonization mean in its cultural and socio-political valences now? What constitutes creativity, the imagination, experimentation, community, and embodiment at the present moment? What kinds of activist and cultural labour can criticism and creative writing perform? What forms might such criticism and creative writing take? This iteration of the serial TransCanada conferences invites storytellers, poets, novelists, creative non-fiction writers, critics, interdisciplinary practitioners and activists to enter into newly imagined and innovatively structured forms of presentation in order to re-build a vibrant, generative, re-productive, critical and creative community, to ask the hard questions that need to be asked now, to attempt some provisional answers, and to make story, poem and experiment together and apart.

Keywords to be addressed:

Affect • Activism & Activism as Performance • Asianness • Avant-Garde • Balance • Blackness • Body • Coalition • Creative & Critical Practices • Cultural Economies • Decolonization • Diaspora • Earth/ Water/ Air/ Fire/ Metal • Experimentation & Experimental Writing • Forms (Literary, Cultural) • Forms & Politics / Forms in Relation to Social Practices • The Humanities in Canada • Imagination • Indigeneity • Inheritance / Heritage • Institution • Justice • Kinships • Land • Literature & Activism • Migration • Nation/ Nationalisms • New Materialisms • Neo-liberalism • Post-Humanism • The Present • The Public • Reconciliation • Redress • Refugeeness • Relation • Transatlantic • Transnationalism • Treaties • Writing as Practice


Submission Guidelines

Please submit proposals of up to 300 words for 20-minute-long papers that address any of the above issues. Collaborative proposals for panel sessions that break the conference mold in interesting and generative ways, as well as proposals for stand-alone presentations (performances, films, videos, poster presentations, and other forms of “demonstration”) will be most welcome. We wish to extend a special invitation to Ph.D. students for the Plenary Session especially designed for the presentation of doctoral research projects in the field of Canadian literary studies. Doctoral students whose dissertation projects are nearing completion of their program and who would like to be considered for this plenary session

should submit a proposal based on their dissertation project, along with a one-page (single-spaced) dissertation abstract. Three to five such projects will be featured in this plenary session, while other projects will be vetted for inclusion in the concurrent panel sessions.


Deadline for all submissions: June 30, 2016

Notification of acceptance: by September 2016

Submission address:
http://tinyurl.com/Mininaak-Trans

Guidelines for submission: Please submit your abstract via email as a Word document

attachment; ensure that your name and institutional affiliation don’t appear on the

abstract document; and use TC4-2017-abstract submission as the subject heading.

Proposals for panels should include the name/s of the panel convener/s, a brief rationale,

and abstracts by no more than three presenters.


Organizing Committee:


Co-chairs:

Smaro Kamboureli, Avie Bennett Chair in Canadian Literature, University of Toronto

Larissa Lai, Canada Research Chair, University of Calgary


Kit Dobson, Department of English, Mount Royal University

Petra Dolata, Canada Research Chair, University of Calgary

James Ellis, Director, Calgary Institute of the Humanities, University of Calgary

Emily Gilbert, Canadian Studies and Department of Geography, University of Toronto

Kyle Kinaschuk, PhD Student, Department of English, University of Toronto

Neil Surkan, PhD Student, Department of English, University of Calgary

Cheryl Suzack, Department of English, University of Toronto

Christina Turner, PhD Student, Department of English, University of Toronto

Christl Verduyn, Director, Canadian Studies and Department of English, Mount Allison University

Joshua Whitehead, PhD Student, Department of English, University of Calgary

Robert Zacharias, Department of English, York University


For background information about the TransCanada conferences, please visit:

http://tinyurl.com/Mininaak-Trans

 

 

DEADLINE EXTENDED: MARCH 30, 2016

 

DIGITAL TEXTUALITIES/

CANADIAN CONTEXTS

 

TEXTUALITÉS NUMÉRIQUES/

CONTEXTES CANADIENS

 

Canadian Writing Research Collaboratory Launch

Conference, Sept. 20-22, 2016

 

Papers on the intersection of text and the digital in the

Canadian context are invited for a two-day conference

celebrating the launch of the Canadian Writing Research

Collaboratory (CWRC) at the University of Alberta.

 

Keynote: Lori Emerson (University of Colorado at

Boulder)

 

The conference provides an occasion to take stock of

digital approaches to writing and culture in Canada,

whether they focus on Canadian artifacts or digitally

investigate literary and cultural matters from within the

Canadian academic context. How have the particulars of

Canadian culture, infrastructure, and academic

structures impacted digital literary and cultural studies?

What kinds of local, regional, organizational,

institutional, or national factors have inflected the

relationship between culture and technology in Canada?

Are our diverse identities, histories, politics, and

infrastructures reflected in how we read, write, and

research digitally? What have digital approaches contributed to our understanding of Canadian literature,

culture, and identity categories?

 

CWRC is an online environment for scholarly research,

bringing together Canadian and international

researchers who work with online technologies to

investigate writing and related cultural practices

relevant to the Canadian context. CWRC supports the

creating, uploading, sharing, enhancing and curating of

research materials by interlinking the contents of

individual projects and by supporting team-based

collaboration. It brings together bibliographical,

biographical, critical, and prosopographical work,

scholarly transcription and editing, and multi-media

collections, supporting scholars interested in exploring

the potential of digital knowledge production to

advance their research agendas.

 

For those interested in trying out the CWRC research

space, free workshops will be offered on Tuesday

September 20th and Thursday September 22nd.

 

We are interested in papers that take up digital literary

or cultural research, broadly conceived, in Canada,

including, for instance,

• digital humanities research in and on Canadian

literature and culture: histories, trends, practices, possibilities, resources

• reading and writing (about) Canadian literature in

the digital age

• Indigeneity and digital culture

• Canadian e-literature

• digital collaboration: working collectively in the

academic context

• online research and the academy: support,

structures, protocols

• producing and reading digital texts

• technologies of image, text, and sound preservation

and presentation

• intellectual property

• gender and marginalized identities in a digital

context

• invisible research and development: digital

researcher as academic avatar

• reading and writing digital games

• interfaces: design, politics, subjectivities

• digital readership: identifying constituencies for

research

• close and distant readings of digital texts

• digital self-publishing

• the borders and the shape of the digital nation

• area studies and digital scholarship in Canadian

contexts: who is digital and why?

• crossing disciplinary, institutional, and community

divides; public facing digital humanities

• the contexts, challenges and discontents of

collaboration

• new technologies and old scholarship: bibliography

in the digital context

• the impact of digital humanities resources in and on

Canada on literary and cultural study; anthologies

and datasets

• Canadian innovations in text analysis and text

mining

 

Please send 250-word proposals in English or French for

20-minute papers along with a 150-word biographical

statement by email to cwrc.conference@gmail.com

by March 30, 2016.

 

 

Papers on the intersection of text and the digital in the Canadian context are invited for a two-day conference celebrating the launch of the Canadian Writing Research Collaboratory (CWRC) at the University of Alberta. Please send 250-word proposals in English or French for 20-minute papers along with a 150-word biographical statement by email to cwrc.conference@gmail.com by March 20, 2016. Click here to read the call for paper.
The art of recreation: practice, performance and formation : Conference under the direction of Peggy Roquigny and Laurent Turcot Chaire de recherche du Canada en histoire des loisirs et des divertissements, UQTR, Trois-Rivières Qc, November 24 and 25, 2016. Proposals should be sent by e-mail (PDF or word format) to the following address: peggy.roquigny@uqtr.ca. Participants will be contacted by mid-June.
Maladies of the Soul, Emotion, Affect:
Indigenous, Canadian, and Québécois Writings in the Crossfire of a New Turn
 

Banff Centre, 22-25 September 2016

A Conference Organized by the Canadian Literature Centre at the University of Alberta and the Canadian Studies Centre at the University of Innsbruck

Proposals (250 words per paper), in English or in French, with a short biographical note (50 words), should be submitted to clcconf@ualberta.ca by February 1, 2016.

Keynotes

  • Daniel Heath Justice, University of British Columbia
  • Smaro Kamboureli, University of Toronto
  • Daniel Laforest, University of Alberta

Round-Table of Invited Authors

  • Nicole Brossard, Montreal, Quebec
  • Louise Dupré, Montreal, Quebec
  • Katherena Vermette, Winnipeg, Manitoba
  • Aritha van Herk, Calgary, Alberta

According to D. Bachmann-Medick, a scientific turn is not synonymous with the radical reorientation of a single discipline but basically provides a new pluri- and transdisciplinary perspective complementing and reinforcing already existing approaches. A new turn does not supplant another but becomes part of a dynamic process of competing forces, which eventually may give rise to new categories of analysis and concepts. Studying both the general implications and the positive effects and deficits of such a turn is particularly rewarding when it comes to comparing different academic traditions and – as is the case with this transatlantic and transdisciplinary conference – different literary productions written in different languages.

In the wake of the conference “Crisis and Beyond,” held at the University of Innsbruck in 2015, “Maladies of the Soul, Emotion, Affect” not only responds to recent attention to affect, or the “affective turn” dubbed by Patricia Clough, but also investigates the impact of previous forms of research both on emotions and cognition on the study of Indigenous, Canadian and Québécois writings in English and French. If empathy and agency have evolved as new guiding principles in some fields of literary analysis, their roots can be found in such classical disciplines as poetics, rhetoric, or hermeneutics (Th. Anz), and also in the focus on agency advocated by the Constance school of reception theory. While selecting contemporary Indigenous, Canadian and Québécois writings in English and French as a body of investigation, the participants are encouraged to explore the emotional and affective implications of the process of literary communication, including both conceptual and empirical research and covering the following aspects:

  • the emotional and affective habitus of the producer (the “real” author), her / his intentional or non-intentional use of techniques of emotionalisation, her / his definition of a specific poetics, and their possible impact on the text
  • the emotional and affective response of the “real” reader to these techniques
  • the text as a vehicle of emotions or affects which names, discusses or presents them as parts of the mental habitus of the protagonists (Th. Anz); the aesthetic question of how such processes are evoked (use of metaphors, inscription of the body, syntax of the unspeakable, etc.).

The focus on contemporary literature necessarily confronts us with S. Žižek’s assessment of the 21st century as the “apocalyptic zero point” and S. Ahmed’s, L. Berlant’s and others’ warnings of the West’s “cruel” attachments to neoliberal optimism. S. Ngai identifies “ugly feelings” while M.C. Nussbaum addresses the ethics of care as an affective, and alternative, form of knowledge, agency, and democracy (J. Tronto).

  • And so what are the affects and emotions that index the particularity of our literary moment or our moment of crisis
  • How does intimacy or privacy respond to publicness?
  • What is today’s equivalent of Romantic ennui and melancholy?Do situations of exile and migration enhance the new “maladies of the soul” (J. Kristeva)?
  • Do authors ask questions of liveliness and animacy (M.Y. Chen)?
  • Which lives today are considered worth living and are recognized as such (J. Butler)?
  • How might Indigenous literary and critical interventions undo the very categorizations and labels suggested by this call for papers and enable us to tell different stories (D.H. Justice)?

These and other lines of critical inquiry – on the basis of the above-mentioned emotional and affective implications of literary communication – are designed to allow participants to approach affect, emotion, and the new maladies of the soul of this 21st century, a task which will advance terminological, methodological, and theoretical knowledge both in the fields of affect and emotion and of text analysis.

In the treatment of this description, we encourage comparative, multidisciplinary, and interdisciplinary perspectives and methodologies. We invite proposals of traditional 20-minute papers as well as other forms of presentation such as short 10-minute position papers, round-tables, or pecha kucha presentations. Complete panel proposals (of 3 or 4 papers) are also highly encouraged.

Organizing Committee

Review Committee

  • Albert Braz, University of Alberta
  • Evelyne Gagnon, University of Alberta
  • Simon Harel, Université de Montréal
  • Larissa Lai, University of Calgary
  • Brigit Mertz-Baumgartner, University of Innsbruck

This second conference will take place at the Banff Centre in Canada September 22-25, 2016. Situated in Banff National Park, surrounded by the magnificent scenery of the Rockies, the Banff Centre is a unique place to promote the arts and all disciplines on a Canadian and on an international level. For further information concerning the Canadian Literature Centre at the University of Alberta, please visit www.abclc.ca.

The organizing committee of the 2016 Canadian Literature Symposium at the University of Ottawa is pleased to make available the full program of the bilingual international Shakespeare + Canada Symposium taking place at the University of Ottawa next year:  April 21 through April 23, 2016.  We have a fabulous line-up of speakers and events, so please take a look.  We’re hoping to see some of our Canadianist colleagues there!
Registration details are available on the U of Ottawa Shakespeare 400 website at http://artsites.uottawa.ca/shakespeare-celebrations/en/call-for-papers/ The registration fee includes a ticket to the production of Vern Thiessen’s play Shakespeare’s Will on Thursday evening, April 21st.
CALL FOR PAPERS

 

Working in the University of Calgary’s
Canadian Literary Archives
A Round Table sponsored by the
Bibliographical Society of Canada (BSC) and the
Canadian Association for the Study of Book Culture (CASBC)
Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences
University of Calgary
Proposed Date of Round Table: Monday, May 30, 2016

 

For many decades, the library at the University of Calgary has made a significant commitment to collecting the archives of Canadian writers. Their extensive list of holdings ranges from well-known authors (such as Robert Kroetsch, Alice Munro, and Mordecai Richler) to fairly obscure figures; it also includes other participants in the country’s literary infrastructure such as ECW Press and Descant magazine. Taking advantage of the location of Congress 2016 at the University of Calgary, the BSC and CASBC are jointly sponsoring a round table on research in these archives and invite researchers to discuss their experiences.

 

Topics are open, and may include such matters as:
  • how the contents and gaps in the archive have shaped your research;
  • issues of gender, class, ethnicity and literary genre in relation to archival collections;
  • canonicity (who is collected);
  • serendipity in archival research;
  • the role of literary archives in the classroom.

 

We envisage a round table of 5 or 6 speakers who will make brief presentations of no more than 10 minutes, followed by a general discussion.  Graduate students and those in the midst of archival projects are encouraged to participate.

 

Please submit a brief proposal (maximum 250 words) and a one-page CV to proposals@bsc-sbc.ca

 

Deadline: Friday, January 15, 2016