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Professors

Juana M. LICERAS is a professor in the Department of Modern Languages and the Department of Linguistics of the University of Ottawa (Canada). She is a member of several editorial boards as well as the director of the Language Acquisition Research Laboratory of the University of Ottawa. Her research interests and publications deal with the relationship between linguistic theory, first and second language acquisition, comparative grammar, language contact, and bilingualism.

 

Contact: jliceras@uottawa.ca

Elena VALENZUELA is an assistant professor in the Department Modern Languages and Literatures of the University of Ottawa (Canada). She is the co-director of Language Acquisition Research Laboratory of the University of Ottawa. Her research interests are in the area of language acquisition, bilingualism, heritage speaker bilinguals, and linguistic theory.

 

Contact: Elena.Valenzuela@uottawa.ca

Alain DESROCHERS is professor at the School of Psychology of the University of Ottawa (Canada).  His area of expertise includes research methods in psycholinguistics, the study of language processes in children and adults, and statistical analysis of language data. His research program aims at investigating the historical evolution of alphabetic languages, the development of language assessment tools, the development of language skills in children aged 5 to 12, cognitive processes that support fluent reading in French-, English-, and Spanish-speaking adults, and the quantitative analysis of the French, English, and Spanish lexicons.

Contact: damch@uottawa.ca

Laura SABOURIN is an assistant professor in the Department of Linguistics of the University of Ottawa (Canada). Her research field lies in the area of language processing and second language acquisition and it focus on the following issues: (1) the nature of both first and second language acquisition; (2) how language processing changes during the stages of language acquisition and (3) whether linguistic training can have effects on the neural organization of language in the brain. She is currently conducting research with monolingual, bilingual and second language learners in order to obtain a full picture of how language is organized in the brain. She is also de director of the ERPLing lab.

Contact: Laura.Sabourin@uottawa.ca

Tania ZAMUNER is an assistant professor in the Department of Linguistics of the University of Ottawa (Canada). Her research focuses on developmental psycholinguistics, and investigates the mechanisms that underlie our ability to perceive and produce language and language contact.

 

 

Contact: tzamuner@uOttawa.ca

Nikolay Slavkov is an assistant professor at the Official Languages and Bilingualism Institute at the University of Ottawa. His interests include shifts between active and passive bilingualism in child language acquisition, language attrition and language recovery phenomena, minority and heritage language acquisition and maintenance, acquisition of long-distance wh- movement in L2 English, and imperfective constructions and clitic doubling in Slavic.

 

Contact: nslavkov@uOttawa.ca

 

 

Graduate students

Estela GARCÍA-ALCARAZ. Ph.D. candidate.

Irina GOUNDAREVA. Ph.D. candidate. Irina joined the lab in 2011. She completed her MA in Spanish at the University of British Columbia (2011) and her BA in Linguistics and Hispanic Studies at theUniversity of Victoria (2006). Currently she is taking courses and preparing for the Ph.D. exam next year. Her academic interests include language acquisition and teaching, language interaction and multilingualism. She has taught Spanish at the University of Victoria, the University of British Columbia and the University of Ottawa.

Contact: irusiag@live.com

Kristina BORG. Ph.D. candidate. Kristina joined the lab in 2012. She holds an MA in Spanish from the University of Ottawa and an Honours BA in Modern Languages, Literatures and Cultures from Mount Allison University in Sackville, New Brunswick.  She is currently completing coursework and preparing for the comprehensive examinations. Her main research interests are in third language acquisition (L3A) and multilingualism. She has taught several Spanish language courses at the University of Ottawa.

Contact: kborg044@uottawa.ca

Leonardo ALVES-SOARES. Ph.D. candidate.

Luz Patricia LÓPEZ-MORELOS. Ph.D. candidate. Luz-Patricia joined the lab in 2008. She completed her MA in Spanish Linguistics at the University of Ottawa in 2011. She has been teaching Spanish since 2001 at several institutions such as Algonquin College, the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) campus Gatineau, Elmwood School and the University of Ottawa. She is currently a full time student and preparing herself for the PhD. exam next year. Her subject of interest is heritage language acquisition.

Contact: llope101@uottawa.ca

Nelson MÉNDEZ. Ph.D. candidate. Nelson joined the lab in 2010. He completed his Master of Education at Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León in Monterrey, Mexico and his BA in Modern Languages at Universidad de Los Andes, Mérida, Venezuela. He is currently working on his Ph.D dissertation. His research topic is on the Spanish-Guajiro language contact situation. Particularly, his research focuses on the expression of the subject personal pronoun and subject-verb agreement of the Spanish spoken by the Guajiro indigenous people of Uribia, Guajira State, Colombia.

Contact: nelsonmendez@nelsonmendez.com

Nicté FULLER-MEDINA. Ph.D. candidate.

Rachel KLASSEN. Ph.D. candidate. Rachel joined the lab in 2010. She holds an MA in Spanish Linguistics from the University of Ottawa (2011) and an Honours BA in Languages from Wilfrid Laurier University (2008). She is currently investigating the mental representation of grammatical gender systems in bilinguals. Her areas of interest include language acquisition, language processing, and code-switching as well as experimental design and online research methodologies such as eye-tracking and Event Related Potentials (ERPs). She has taught various levels of Spanish at the University of Ottawa.

Contact: rklas092@uottawa.ca

Raquel LLAMA. Ph.D. candidate.

Saul Leonardo MORENO, Ph.D. candidate.

Yoriko AIZU. Ph.D. candidate. Yoriko joined the lab in 2010. She holds an MA in Linguistics from the University of Ottawa (2001) and an Honours BA in Languages from Ritsumeika  University in Japan (1999). She is currently investigating acquisition and processing of Japanese sentence structures (Syntax). She compares acquisition and processing of L2 learners to heritage speakers.

 

Collaborators

Diana CARTER joined the lab in 2004. She completed her BA in European Studies at the University of Guelph, where she spent a year abroad at the Universidad de La Rioja in Spain. She completed her MA in Hispanic Studies at the University of Western Ontario. Her MA thesis focused on variation and dialectology in Spain. At the University of Ottawa she completed her PhD dissertation on the syntax and semantics of the mass-count distinction in first and second languages. After spending a year as an Assistant Professor of Spanish Linguistics at the University of Alabama, she relocated to the University of Wales in Bangor where she conducted corpus-based research on Spanish-English and Welsh-English bilingualism. Currently she holds a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Calgary in the Department of French, Italian and Spanish.

Contact: diana@dianacarter.ca

Hanako FUJINO holds a PhD from the Universidad Complutense of Madrid.  Her research interests focus on second language acquisition and Japanese language teaching. In her PhD dissertation she worked on the SLA of Japanese nominal modifiers. Her recent research also includes issues concerning the adaptation of Japanese language teaching to European standards (CEFR). At present she is a Professor in Great Britain.

Keiko KAKU-MacDonald holds a PhD in Linguistics from the University of ottawa. Her research interests focus on the field of linguistics, especially second language acquisition and psycholinguistics. Her research combines theories on generative approaches of second language acquisition and probabilistic cognitive learning theory examined through psycholinguistic techniques to understand the mechanisms of second language learning. She is also a bilingual consultant (Japanese/English) in Seattle, Washington.

Contact: keikokaku@gmail.com

María LANDA-BUIL holds a PhD from the Universidad Complutense of Madrid.  Her main field of research is Second Language Acquisition. In her PhD dissertation she investigated the Spanish Interlanguage of Swahili speakers. She aimed to determine whether there were traces of the Bantu noun classification in the Spanish Interlanguage of Swahili speakers. She also compared the data with Spanish Creole languages, especially with Palenquero, which has a Bantu substratum.  At present she holds a lecturer position at the Centre for Language Learning, University of the West Indies, St. Augustine, and is the Coordinator of the Spanish program.

Contact: maria.landa@sta.uwi.edu

Rocio PEREZ-TATTAM came to the University of Ottawa in 2001 to do an M.A. in Spanish at the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures. In 2002, she became involved with the Language Acquisition Research Lab as a research assistant. She was part of the team that transcribed the English recordings of the FerFuLice corpus, currently available on CHILDES. In 2007, she defended her PhD dissertation on the acquisition of complex syntax in bilingual and non-native learners of Spanish. She currently holds a post-doctoral appointment at the ESRC Centre for Research on Bilingualism at Bangor University, UK, where she is looking at the bilingual acquisition of a number of linguistic phenomena by means of experimental methods: gender in Welsh and Spanish, compounding in English and Spanish, processing of sentential participant roles and semantic categorization. Rocio’s research interests concern the interaction between the knowledge of two languages in the bilingual mind, which results in differential language development in bilinguals compared to monolinguals, and issues of language assessment (such as the importance of assessing bilinguals in their two languages for a more complete picture of their language ability).

Contact: r.p.tattam@bangor.ac.uk

Cristina SENN joined the lab in 2002. She collaborated on research projects, gathering and analyzing experimental data from native and non-native Spanish speakers. She completed her PhD in Spanish Linguistics at the University of Ottawa in 2008. With the aim of revising the characterization of the term “near-native speaker”, her PhD dissertation investigated two constructions that evidence unstable areas of the Spanish language: Resumptive Pronouns in ambiguous Restrictive Relative Clauses, and Optional Dative Clitic Doubling. In 2009, Cristina joined the Department of Critical Studies at the University of British Columbia-Okanagan, where she works as a Spanish Sessional Lecturer.

Contact: Cristina.senn@ubc.ca

Cristina MARTÍNEZ-SANZ. Ph.D. Cristina joined the lab in 2003. She completed her undergraduate degree in Spanish Philology at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid (1996-2001), and her MA in Spanish Linguistics at the University of Ottawa. In her research she has explored syntactic variation and language change, cross-dialectal variation and first and second language acquisition. She has taught Spanish at all levels (ESP1991, 2991, 2992, and 3992) at the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures of the University of Ottawa. Cristina has also participated in teacher training programs in Spain and Canada and has coordinated the basic Spanish program at Florida International University (2009). She currently lives in Madrid, Spain, where she continues researching in her fields of interest.

Contact: cristina.martinez.sanz@gmail.com

Aziz NAJMI is Assistant Professor of Linguistics in the English Department at Umm Al-Qura University (Saudi Arabia). He completed his PhD in Linguistics   at the University of Ottawa in 2009. His research and teaching interests include second language acquisition and psycholinguistics.

Contact: ahnajmi@uqu.edu.sa

Miroslav SLOWIK is a PhD candidate at Masarykyana University in Brno (Czech Republic). Miroslav has a B.A. in Hispanic and Czech Philology from the University of Ostrava (Czech Republic). He worked as an Assistant Professor at that University for several years. In 2007 he obtained the Spanish Ministry of External Affairs scholarship and spent a year at the University of Cantabria, Spain, where he conducted research in Spanish and Czech pragmalinguistics. This also marked the beginning of his collaboration with Susana Perales and Juana M. Liceras in the analysis of Czech as well as Old and Modern Spanish native and non-native clitics. His main areas of research are pragmalinguistics and second language acquisition.

Contact: miroslav.slowik@gmail.com

Sue WINTER joined the lab in 2014. She completed an MA in Linguistics at the University of Ottawa where her major research paper focused on the acquisition of topic-comment sentence structures in the English of Deaf individuals. She is continuing her research into topic-comment constructions, expanding the scope of the speakers to include individuals learning English as a second language (ESL). Her ESL teaching experience, in Canada, China and Serbia, includes language learners of all levels and mostly Chinese and Arabic mother tongues.  She currently works as an EAP teacher in Ottawa.

Visiting professors

Almudena BASANTA joined the lab in 2011. She holds a Ph.D . from the Universidad Complutense de Madrid with a specialization in dialectology and semantics. For 15 years she taught Spanish language and culture at European Institutions in Brussels (Belgium) for multilingual professionals. From 2004 to 2011 she was an Assistant Professor in the Department of International Business Communication in the Faculty of Applied Economics of the University of Antwerp (Belgium). From 2008 to 2012 she was an invited professor at the Faculté de philosophie, arts et letters of the Université Catholique de Louvain. She has also taught Spanish at the Instituto Cervantes in Brussels (Belgium) and she currently teaches at the National Autonomous University of Mexico in Québec. Her research interests are in the areas of language pedagogies, languages in contact and the history of Romance languages. She is presently (2012-2013) PromoDoc Ambassador. Promodoc is a project funded by the European Commission within the framework of the Erasmus Mundus Action 3 (EM A3) focusing on the promotion of European higher education at the doctoral level. [www.promodoc.eu]

 

Visiting students

Isabel CONTRO CASTALDO is a PhD candidate at University of Sao Paulo (Brazil), she completed her MA at University of Sao Paulo (Brazil) in 2014​,​ and her undergraduate in Portuguese and Spanish​ Languages​ at ​the ​University of Mackenzie in Sao Paulo (Brazil). Her subject of interest in the linguistic field is ​​second language acquisition, mainly Spanish as second language ​for​ Brazilian learners, and comparative grammar between Brazilian Portuguese and Spanish. Currently she ​holds a 7 month Brazilian government scholarship (CAPES) to work at ​the ​University of Ottawa ​on her research with Juana Muñoz Liceras. In her country, she works as an assistant professor at the University of Mackenzie in Sao Paulo (Brazil) and as assistant professor at the Faculty of Technology of Sao Paulo (Brazil).

Contact: icast053@uottawa.caisacontrocastaldo@usp.br